Literary tradition and genealogy

So, how does a book critic open a book? The New York Times Book Review Critic, Parul Sehgal, now a daily Books of the Times reviewer, answers this in a Q&A session with fellow editor, Stephen Hiltner. A segment of her interview appeared in the The New York Times earlier in September. Sehgal speaks to her … Continue reading Literary tradition and genealogy

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Marilynne Robinson on “the dance with language”

Author Marilynne Robinson is a true lover of words. In a recent New York Times Book Review essay, she divulged her love of the essentials of words, particularly in Emily Dickinson -- a poet of "parsimoniousness". As Robinson admits, with writing, she is drawn to that movement toward essentials, away from all secondary definitions, all … Continue reading Marilynne Robinson on “the dance with language”

Karl Ove Knausgaard on the most interesting thing he learned from a book

Last weekend's New York Times Book Review interviewed with the Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgaard, author most-famously of the 6-part autobiographical series My Struggle and the recently released Autumn, for their By the Book section. Every week authors answer bookish questions, such as "What's your favorite book?", or "What books are on your nightstand now?", among others. Here is my favorite … Continue reading Karl Ove Knausgaard on the most interesting thing he learned from a book

George Saunders’ Graduation Speech

It's graduation season!! This weekend I'm heading to Northampton in Western Massachusetts in New England for my little sister's graduation (woohoo!!). So in the spirit of all graduates, my Friday inspiration comes from a graduation speech by George Saunders in 2013 at Syracuse University. The premise of Saunders' speech is - among other things, like … Continue reading George Saunders’ Graduation Speech